Intro

I am not alone in considering Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman's recorded lectures based on their book "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs" is a masterpiece.

There are many things to like about the content of the lectures, beginning with some pearls and wisdom about the craft of writing software (even though this is not really a "software enginneering" book), the clarity with which the concepts are described, the Freedom-friendly aspects of the authors regarding the material that they produced and much, the breadth of the subjects covered and much more.

The videos, their length, and splitting them

The course consists of 20 video files and they are all uploaded on Youtube already.

There is one thing, though: while the lectures are naturally divided into segments (the instructors took a break in after every 30 minutes or so worth of lectures), the videos corresponding to each lecture have all the segments concatenated.

To better watch them, accounting for the easier possibility to put a few of the lectures in a mobile device or to avoid fast forwarding long videos from my NAS when I am watching them on my TV (and some other factors), I decided to sit down, take notes for each video of where the breaks where, and write a simple Python script to help split the videos in segments, and, then, reencode the segments.

I decided not to take the videos from Youtube to perform my splitting activities, but, instead, to operate on one of the "sources" that the authors once had in their homepage (videos encoded in DivX and audio in MP3). The videos are still available as a torrent file (with a magnet link for the hash 650704e4439d7857a33fe4e32bcfdc2cb1db34db), with some very good souls still seeding it (I can seed it too, if desired). Alas, I have not found a source for the higher quality MPEG1 videos, but I think that the videos are legible enough to avoid bothering with a larger download.

I soon found out that there are some beneficial side-effects of splitting the videos, like not having to edit/equalize the entire audio of the videos when only a segment was bad (which is understandable, as these lectures were recorded almost 30 years ago and technology was not as advanced as things are today).

So, since I already have the split videos lying around here, I figured out that, perhaps, other people may want to download them, as they may be more convenient to watch (say, during commutes or whatever/whenever/wherever it best suits them).

Of course, uploading all the videos is going to take a while and I would only do it if people would really benefit from them. If you think so, let me know here (or if you know someone who would like the split version of the videos, spread the word).

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